All posts by thelabwithbradbarton

Ep 198: A rough sketch or two, of you, inside of you.



A rough sketch or two, of you, inside of you.

Inside your brain, there are individual neurons that correspond to specific places on your body. If you figure out which cell goes to what part, you’ll notice that the map in your brain looks like a nightmare sketch of you, drawn by a mad artist who’s only heard of humans by rough description. The body and legs are way too small, the hands are huge, your lips are oversized, and your face is upside-down. Today, Phil and I talk about these parts of the brain, with many side trips and much confusion.
Continue reading Ep 198: A rough sketch or two, of you, inside of you.


Ep 197: right brain, left side body; left brain, right side body… why?



right brain, left side body; left brain, right side body… why?

Our brains have crossed wires. Each cerebral hemisphere controls the opposite side of the body. When I move my left hand, it’s my right brain that’s doing it. Today, Phil and I look at a theory about how and why that’s true for us, and every other animal with a spine.
Continue reading Ep 197: right brain, left side body; left brain, right side body… why?


Ep 196: How neurons find their home



How neurons find their home

Even before birth, billions of brain cells have to figure out what sort of cell to be, where to be, and which other neurons to connect to. Today we talk about the complicated processes that help neurons find their home.
Continue reading Ep 196: How neurons find their home


Ep 195: Baby’s brain before birth



Baby’s brain before birth

As we continue our close look at the human brain, we take some time to look at how it grows and develops. The story starts before you are born, when a man and woman love each other very much, and…
Continue reading Ep 195: Baby’s brain before birth


Ep 194: The lowly, yet complex, neuron



The lowly, yet complex, neuron

Finally done with natural history, today we start talking about the brain. It is extremely complicated. Even a single brain cell, one neuron, is an intricate little machine. Today we take a look at the neuron, and how it sends signals.


It bloody well works!



Written on Wednesday October3, 2018

Small sample sizes and all those caveats.

I’m tossing out the number of figures being born as a threshold. That will pop out of any of them at any time, and it’s just luck. One of them starts reproducing very quickly, and happens to find a window of relatively few mutation’s, and then skate on through to the finish line.

I retested the first five populations, snagged with a threshold of 100 and 100,000, if memory servs me. Looking at the most mutations given to a population, side by side results, first five and latest five.
Continue reading It bloody well works!


I was going to say that’s going nowhere, but looking at my notes just now.



Written on Tuesday October 2, 2018

It seemed like a good idea. Let evolution solve the mutation problem for me. This is procrastination, as what I really need to do next is update the documentation and archive this version. It’s time to clean up the code and concentrate on making the system run faster. Still, I had a few days, and I’d notice that some populations were much more resistant to mutation than others.
Continue reading I was going to say that’s going nowhere, but looking at my notes just now.


Think I was trying for the wrong thing.



Written on Thursday September 27, 2018

mutation each extinction
figures1 skipcom
5.pop average 73
figures just fat
6.pop average 48
x.pop average 460 just fat longest with mu 131616 without only 38453
61.pop keeps doing too well to tell

I was trying to make s.pop into a six figures steady pop size stable population. I wanted to recreate 6.pop whose magic children have done so well that they climb off the measurement scale. I set things up so that s.pop was read from disc and stored in memory. Then, when s.pop died out, she’d be restored from memory rather than from disc. Mutations would happen unless the population was within a certain size range. Once it was all ready and as tested as I was willing to bother with, I let er rip.
Continue reading Think I was trying for the wrong thing.


Ep 193: The Pleistocene Ice and rat poo



The Pleistocene Ice and rat poo

For our final episode on the topic of natural history, we take a look at the Pleistocene. This epoch was the most recent ice age, and toward the end of this time, lots of the largest land mammals went extinct, while in the middle of the epoch, humans finally arrived on the scene.
Continue reading Ep 193: The Pleistocene Ice and rat poo